For Immediate Release  
Tuesday, Oct. 28, 2014

For More Information
Melanie Kaye

No Labels highlights 50 leaders who have earned Problem Solver Seal of Approval

Washington, D.C.— One week from Election Day, No Labels — a national group dedicated to moving beyond partisan politics and on to problem solving — has announced its final list of 50 candidates and congressional incumbents who have earned the group’s “Problem Solver Seal of Approval” this election cycle. The move comes after a recent NBC/Wall Street Journal poll that says most voters will base their Election Day choices on two issues: “breaking the partisan gridlock in Washington to get things done” and “job creation and economic growth.” 

“The message is clear: Americans want problem solvers,” said Margaret Kimbrell, Executive Director of No Labels. “Candidates are proud of being called problem solvers, and they should be. November 4 is the time for voters to show candidates that you support those who will bring a problem solver attitude to Washington.” 

Elected officials and candidates who support development of No Labels’ National Strategic Agenda and who work to solve problems in a bipartisan way receive the seal of approval; most have chosen to use it as a credential as they seek election.

The National Strategic Agenda will be built on four widely agreed-upon goals (based on a nationwide survey): 

  • Create 25 million new jobs over the next 10 years;
  • Balance the federal budget by 2030;
  • Secure Medicare and Social Security for another 75 years; and
  • Make America energy secure by 2024.

The completed National Strategic Agenda will be unveiled in New Hampshire and Iowa on October 5, 2015, just as the presidential election campaign season is ramping up. No Labels will work to inject the agenda into the presidential debate by activating its network of citizens, members of Congress, and state and local leaders across America.

Supporters of the No Labels effort come from across the political spectrum — Democrat, Republican and Independent. 

The 50 recipients of the No Labels Seal of Approval this election cycle are:


Eliot Cutler, I-Maine

Rep. Tim Griffin, R-Ark.

Rep. Mike Michaud, D-Maine

U.S. Senate

Rep. Bruce Braley, D-Iowa

State Sen. Joni Ernst, R-Iowa

Rep. Cory Gardner, R-Colo

 U.S. House

 Rep. Andy Barr, R-Ky. 

Rep. John Barrow, D-Ga.

Rep. Ami Bera, D-Calif. 

Rep. Sanford D. Bishop Jr., D-Ga.

Rep. Larry Bucshon, R-Ind. 

Rep. Cheri Bustos, D-Ill.

Rep. Tony Cardenas, D-Calif.

Rep. Mike Coffman, R-Colo.

Rep. Rodney Davis, R-Ill.  

Rep. John Delaney, D-Md.

Rep. Jeff Denham, R-Calif.

Rep. Charlie Dent, R-Pa.

Former Rep. Bob Dold, R-Ill.  

Rep. Mike Fitzpatrick, R-Pa.       

Rep. Joe Garcia, D-Fla. 

Rep. Chris Gibson, R-N.Y.

Rep. Lynn Jenkins, R-Kan.  

Rep. Bill Johnson, R-Ohio  

Rep. Dave Joyce, R-Ohio  

Ro Khanna, D-Calif. 

Rep. Derek Kilmer, D-Wash.  

Rep. Adam Kinzinger, R-Ill.  

Rep. Annie Kuster, D-N.H.   

Rep. Dan Lipinski, D-Ill. 

Rep. Dave Loebsack, D-Iowa

Rep. Alan Lowenthal, D-Calif.

Rep. Dan Maffei, D-N.Y. 

Rep. Patrick Murphy, D-Fla.

Rep. Rick Nolan, D-Minn.

Rep. Scott Perry, R-Pa.  

Rep. Scott Peters, D-Calif. 

Rep. Mike Quigley, D-Ill.

Rep. Tom Reed, R-N.Y.  

Rep. Reid Ribble, R-Wis.

Rep. Tom Rice, R-S.C.

Rep. Raul Ruiz, D-Calif. 

Rep. Matt Salmon, R-Ariz

Rep. Brad Schneider, D-Ill. 

Rep. Kurt Schrader, D-Ore. 

Rep. Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz.

Rep. Glenn “GT” Thompson, R-Pa.

Rep. Fred Upton, R-Mich.

Rep. Peter Welch, D-Vt.

Rep. Todd Young, R-Ind.

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No Labels is a national movement of Democrats, Republicans and independents dedicated to a new politics of problem solving. With a network of hundreds of thousands of citizens and local leaders across America and almost 100 allies in the U.S. Congress, they have proposed reform ideas that have been introduced with support across the aisle, passed by Congress, and signed into law, including No Budget, No Pay. In 2014, No Labels called on America's leaders to commit to a new governing process to create a National Strategic Agenda, which will be developed with input from those all across the political spectrum. Find out more at